Its always hard

Getting to know someone with a different background as you is a beautiful thing to experience. You get to learn about their culture and feel apart of it. Being introduced to a different culture opens different thinking habits and just opens your eyes to a whole different world. In the article “Death in the Field” the author Krisen R. Ghodsee explains the shocking news about a fellow patient she use to interact with, who had just died before they were going to meet the next day. This was all heartbreaking news being close to a friend from a different background as you. She created a bond with a woman that came from Bulgaria and lost it within moments of leaving her side. The fieldwork of an anthropologist is amazing work and being able to meet different people across the world, creating bonds, being accepted into society and learning more about their culture can change everything about you. Once being accepted into society you then can become one of the people and build relationships with the different people within that particular group. Not only does it shape your mind but you as a person and makes you more aware of how things are different from your way of living or thinking.

http://savageminds.org/2015/01/08/a-death-in-the-field/#more-15952

 

Advertisements

One thought on “Its always hard

  1. First off, I would like to say that I enjoyed reading your blog post. I agree with much of the material in the post and also think that the anthropological approach to studying other cultures is extremely important and can create a lasting impact on a person. People do develop strong relationships when doing ethnographies and these relationships can last someone a lifetime, like in the case of “Death in the field”.

    However, I would like to say that sometimes anthropologists toe a thin line when developing these relationships with local cultures. Since everyone is human, it is hard for anthropologists to not let their morals get the better of them and sometimes over step their boundaries, like in the case of “Death without weeping”. In this ethnography, the anthropologist involved saved a child’s life who the society deemed not wanting to live, which could have had drastic consequences for the relationship with the anthropologist and the society she was studying.

    Although it is great to develop relationships with different cultures and let the cultures shape you, anthropologists need to be careful when developing these close relationships.

Comments are closed.