Gender and Body

Since taking Anthropology I have learned many different ways to look at life and culture. I have a new view on what sexuality means too. Sexuality doesn’t depend on what men and women look like, rather it is based on one’s preferences and how they were raised culturally. According to Cut, a blog post by Eric Plemons, sex-reassignment surgery is medically essential to “alleviate the psychological distress from gendered misembodiment” (Plemons 2014).

 

Gender changing gives someone a remedial peace with his or her body. It is hard to believe after everything that I’ve been taught, that one’s gender is based on preference, not physical appearance. Doctors rearrange body parts and alter them for the patient’s preferences, but it is the patient whose gender recognition establishes them as their preferred sex, not the body parts themselves. The fact that these people see themselves as cleansed after a surgery like this, is the psychological factor in believing in sexuality.

Gender in Anthropology is based on how one defines oneself. We should no longer look at a man or a woman and classify them into that gender. This teaches us to be more sensitive to the feelings and preferences of others and gives us a respect for the human body and the human mind and their connection to each other. Sometimes the mind’s preferences just don’t agree with what the body has put together for that person, and people should realize that and respect it.

 

Plemons, Eric (2014, March 11). Somatosphere [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://somatosphere.net/2014/03/cut.html

 

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One thought on “Gender and Body

  1. I wish more people thought like this. A sort of universal respect for others’ ideas, identity, etc. 🙂

    One thing I would like to see clarified is when you say gender changing in the beginning of your second paragraph, what do you mean? Do you mean something like a sex change surgery, with a surgical removal or construction of genitalia? Or do you mean playing with society’s ideas of someone’s perceived gender, like a biological female dressing in “male” clothing, as seen in Pascoe’s experience with the Basketball girls?

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